5.0 out of 5 stars 61b5f-christoph2bfischer2bcover2bludwikacontributing to the wealth of still existing companies like Siemens or the Deutsche Bank, December 26, 2015
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Heart still pounding, where do I start? I have already read The Luck of the Weissensteiners’ and ‘The Black Eagle Inn’ as well as ‘Sebastian’. Christoph Fischer fascinates me, not only by his very exact and meticulous research but also by his sense for the intensity and multidimensionality of women’s suffering; women’s experienced emotions while sacrificing themselves for their family and children. CWBY8Hx
Ludwika, one of approximately 12 million forced slave labourers during and shortly after WWII, contributing to the wealth of still existing companies like Siemens or the Deutsche Bank, for example; a beautiful, practical thinking young Polish woman. Beautiful as she was, she soon attracts the attention of an SS officer. During a time where it was essential for surviving to be rather invisible. Her father was MIA while the Polish troops were defeated and disarmed, leaving her with her mother, sister Stasia and daughter Irena to fend for themselves. They ‘had to work the farm on their own now, which they did with dedication and a sense of duty for their family and country’. A long journey follows, at first being protected by a German SS officer, over wearing the “P” for Polish slave workers under German economic exploitation, finding love and losing loved ones, always following her sense of practicality and willing to sacrifice herself, never giving up. I don’t want to give a summary of the book. Read for yourself. Ludwika, a young, innocent woman, trying to deal with what she sees. Christoph Fischer, a writer who has the emotional ability to process a woman’s suffering. Well researched events. A story of ever-repeating suffering during wars. Suffering beyond comprehension. Witnessing atrocities and still, the will to survive. LUDWIKA1Kudos to Christoph Fischer. A remarkable writer who does not let us forget. Christoph Fischer, it sees to me, is seriously attempting to help us understand that wars are a disaster. Destructive. But, he is also giving hope to those who endured and witnessed. Christoph Fischer, an extraordinary writer. We all feel and experience the world in different ways. Christoph Fischer writes to make us understand suffering.
I have received the book with a signature during a book fair. How grateful I am.

5.0 out of 5 stars One woman’s story of survival in Nazi Germany, December 27, 2015
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This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
“Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle to Survive in Nazi Germany” is an historically based novel of struggle and courage by Cristoph Fischer. although I can’t determine if this book is more “faction” (fact-based fiction) or more pure fiction, it’s a corker. And it is particularly important to read now, as the developed world decides how to treat refugees from the Middle East and North Africa. In a climpate much like that of the late 1930s, when Hitler mixed his mad brew of horror and prejudice, books that personalize the plight of individuals when last the world went made are important to us as human beings.
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Lidwika’s story is an iconic one: During World War II, Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, must go to Nazi Germany where she’ll work for an SS officer. There, she’s a second-class citizen in a world. Disaster and death are only a word away.This woman’s story of survival is unique, yet shows us what we risk to day if we close our eyes to what’s happening in our own world.

Five stars.

*****
You can find Excerpts of the Novel here:
Excerpt One
Excerpt Two
Excerpt Threeor

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Find it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/LudwikaNovel/

and on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28111001-ludwika

And I was gobsmacked to find this post From Facebook:

“My favourite twenty reads of the year, in random order. Apologies if I’ve read your book and it’s not on this list. I read a lot of books, enough to make up a top fifty, but for this purpose I feel a list of twenty is enough.”

Robert B Parker – Promised Land
Mary Stewart – Madam, Will You Talk?
Ronesa Aveela – Light Love Shadows
Helen MacInnes – Above Suspicion
Marcia Muller – Locked In
Erin S Riley Oath Breaker
Rachel McGrath – Finding the Rainbow
Terri Lyndie – Wolf Eye Sly
Peter O’Donnell – A Taste for Death
Johanna Craven – Music From Standing Waves
Paulette Mahurin – To Live Out Loud
C.N. Lesley – Sword of Shadows
Winston Graham – Marnie
Jana Petken – The Guardian of Secrets
Tracy Black – Things Fall Apart
Estela Vazquez Perez – Light and Shadows
Francis Durbridge – The Geneva Mystery
G. G. Flicking – A Kiss for a Killer
Diana J Febry – Skeletons of Birkbury
Christoph Fischer – Ludwika

Many, many thanks!

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi 12360399_10153067444957132_5703419004838921262_nGermany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

You can find Excerpts of the Novel here:
Excerpt One
Excerpt Two
Excerpt Three

or

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Find it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/LudwikaNovel/

and on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28111001-ludwika

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