51puh9JMHHL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_REVIEW: CUCKOO CLOCK NEW YORK Esther’s Story (Unbroken Bonds) by Elisabeth Marrion

 

 

Kristallnacht 9 November 1938. Doctor Esther Rosenthal’s husband has just enough time to whisper to her before the SA pulls him out of the door and slams it shut behind him.
Esther has to leave Germany in a hurry and embarks on a journey taking her through Holland, England, and ultimately to the USA.
In Holland she meets a group of children from a Berlin orphanage, the first children to go to England on the Kindertransport. Together with her father Mordechai she joins them on their crossing and accompanies them to Harwich.
The Kindertransport comes to an abrupt end on the outbreak of World War II. What will happen to the children still in Harwich without a new permanent or foster home?
Cuckoo Clock – New York: Esther’s Story‘, is the third book in the Unbroken Bonds series.

My review:VLUU L100, M100 / Samsung L100, M100
I immensely enjoyed the first two in this series and as much as I was looking forward to this, I worried that it wouldn’t live up to my high expectations. It excelled easily. Elisabeth Marrion is a gifted story-teller who really touches your heart with her amazingly drawn characters and storylines.

There are quite a few of those people and sub-plots as teh novel transports us through several European countries and the US.
I’m a big fan of WW2 fiction, although a lot of it can be repetitive and simplistic. Marrion is a master at bringing the human aspect of history alive, personalising the big political picture and weaving it together with skill in her cleverly plotted story.
Esther Rosenthal and her father Modechai’s escape left me at the edge of my seat, yet Marrion never takes it too far, allowing enough space for characterisation and emotional dept.
The Kindertransports are a fascinating subject as is Annie’s story. I cannot recommend this highly enough. Well worth a read.

Find the book in your local Amazon store using this link: http://smarturl.it/CuckooClockNY 

or this http://bookShow.me/B01603WNC8

What other reviewers said:

on 8 October 2015
I thoroughly enjoyed Elisabeth Marrion’s Unbroken Bond series. Cuckoo Clock New York is the third installment of a family’s story and how their lives were affected by the second world war. A great page turner, keeping the reader on edge while keeping fingers crossed that Mordechai and Esther are able to escape Germany while being pursued by Hitler’s henchmen. Another behind the scenes narrative of the effects the war had on civilian life, the ordinary people caught up in the political turmoil of the day. I have grown to love these people and am looking forward to the next novel.
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on 11 October 2015
What a beautifully told, moving story. I long wanted to read more about the children transports from Nazi Germany. This novel is not only a great account of these transports but it has a bunch of very likeable characters who move through Europe against all obstacles of WW2 and its aftermath.
It will move your heart-strings until the last thread of plot is tied up in the epilogue. A heart-felt and amazing piece of historical literature, all the more powerful knowing that much of this (if not all) is based on true people and their lives.
If you are interested in the era this will not disappoint. I’m still thinking of those characters and their amazing lives.

 


Elisabeth was born in Germany in 1948. Her mother was a war widow and met Elisabeth’s father, a corporal in the British RAF after WW II. Elisabeth moved to England in 1969 and today lives with her husband David in the New Forest, opposite the Isle of Wight in Southern England. Elisabeth discovered her love of writing after a successful business courier from which she retired 2003.

Find Elisabeth via her website

and twitter
username Lizziekind

17854077Check out interviews with Elisabeth on my blog here and here

Links to my feature on The Night I Danced with Rommel

and

The Liverpool Connection 517aOCzta3L._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_

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