Mystery Mondays: Julie Seedorf

 

julie 2015 profile picWhat type of crime fiction do you write and why?

So far the type of mysteries I write seem to fall under the Cozy Mystery category although I have had a few reviews that say my books are not your usual cookie cutter cozy. I have to admit I didn’t know what a cozy was when I wrote the first cozy in my Fuchsia Minnesota Series,but in looking for a publishing company that seemed to be where my books fit. The reason I chose cozy or cozy chose me is because I see no need to use questionable language, gore or graphic sex to write a good mystery.

Tell us about the concept behind your books.

How did you get the idea? I get frustrated living in the real world where we have rules and regulations. Don’t get me wrong I feel we need laws and regulations to be able to live together in society but I feel things get carried too far when it comes to telling us what color our houses can be and what we can put in our yards. Getting older has been an experience for me because expectations that get put upon older people were frustrating to me also. Look at the commercials on television about older people to see what tone they set. I come from a generation of women that are tough and have defied what people think of old age. So my books are defiant of all those generalizations. I also wanted to take people away from the real world and its gloom and doom and make them laugh and give them some joy. The ideas just pop in my head and are silly and I began writing and they wind up as my cozy mysteries.

Tell us about your Detective / main character. The_Penderghast_Puzzle_Protectors_jpg

My main character in my newest series and the first book in the series, The Penderghast Puzzle Protectors is Jezabelle Jingle. She is somewhere in her sixties, I never exactly tell her age, lives in the first neighbourhood built in Brilliant Minnesota where the story takes place, and she is sensible yet silly, snarky yet sharp, cares about her neighbours and isn’t afraid to snoop on their lives. It’s a good thing she does because she finds her neighbour Mr. Warbler in trouble. His trouble leads to a whole lot of trouble for the neighbourhood and her neighbours that she formerly kept an eye on with their strange habits get drawn into the story.  Jezabelle keeps secrets too which weaves a mystery within the original mystery.  We have only touched the tip of the iceberg in the first book with the character of Jezabelle. I like to build on my characters as the series progresses so my readers feel they know them and grow to love them.

What is more important in your books – the plot twists or the characters?

For me both plot and characters are important. You can’t have a good plot without strong characters and you can’t have good characters without a strong plot. For me they build on one another. Not only do you have to care about the story but you have to care about the characters for the book to be a success.

Do you plot the entire novel and know who did it before you start, or can that change?

When I start a book I usually have a character or two in mind and an idea of the plot. Usually I have no idea who did it or the twists and turns that will happen in the book. There are times I am writing and so involved in the story that I write something I hadn’t planned and I have to stop because I don’t know what is going to happen next and I am surprised at what I wrote.

Do you include humour?

My cozy mysteries have lots of humour. The characters are strange so some of them are humorous too in the concept of the entire character. I write to make people laugh and lighten their world and if they laugh just once or smile while reading my books I have accomplished my goal.

What are you working on now? 

I am working on the fifth book in the Fuchsia Minnesota Series called Granny Pins A Pilferer. Also I am starting the second book in the Brilliant Minnesota Series. I also have a serious book in the works called The Joy Killer about finding joy as you grow older and the things in life that have killed your joy. It is a book of fiction. I also write my weekly column Something About Nothing where I write about things that are always under the surface but do not get said. We talk about the nothings in life when the somethings really are what wants to be said.

What makes you laugh?

My grandchildren make me laugh. I love to look at the world through the eyes of children. My shysters, Natasha and Boris keep me in stitches and I also love to read funny stories or books that are funny. And I laugh at myself because if we take ourselves too seriously we miss out on life.

Who would you like to invite for dinner?

I would like to invite my father for dinner. He died when I was twenty years old. He died four months before my son and his first grandchild were born. I didn’t know my dad as an adult and I would love to ask him his opinion and advice on so much. I would like to know him as a person not just my dad.

What book are you currently reading and in what format (e-book/paperback/hardcover)?

As of the day I write this I am alternating between the paperback  Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger I invited him to have dinner with my Red Hat group next week and he accepted and he is coming to our library so I am excited about meeting someone with so much talent . I am listening  to two audiobooks, The War Room by Chris Fabry and Happier At Home by Gretchen Rubin. I am also listening to The Penderghast Puzzle Protectors audio to approve it for release.

 

Websites: http://julieseedorf
Blog:          http://sprinklednotes.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/julie.seedorf.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/JulieSeedorf
Amazon Author Page:  http://www.amazon.com/author/julieseedorf

The Penderghast Puzzle Protectors: Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01BDZWAE4
Paperback: Amazon: http://amzn.to/1REieD0
Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/1REisdp
Signed copies available on my website under SHOP: http://www.julieseedorf.com/#!shop/wroqv

julie 2015 profile pic

Author Bio: Julie Seedorf is a Minnesotan. She calls dinner—supper, and lunch—dinner. She has had many careers over her lifetime but her favourite career was that as mother to her children. In later life she became a computer technician, opening her own business. In 2012 Julie signed a contract with Cozy Cat Press for her Fuchsia Minnesota Series. Books included in that series are Granny Hooks a Crook, Granny Skewers A Scoundrel, Granny Snows A Sneak and Granny Forks A Fugitive. Closing her computer business in January 2014 Julie has transitioned to becoming a full time writer adding free-lance work for various newspapers, along with continuing her column, Something About Nothing, which is now in book form in a book of the same name released in early 2015. Her children’s series, Granny’s In Trouble, gives her grandkids a hint of the young Grandma underneath the wrinkles. Her books are light and fluffy and highlight the fact in the midst of life we have to find the humour in bad situations to keep us going. “We all take ourselves too seriously and we need to have a little fun.” Julie secretly yearns to be like the Granny characters in her books. In February 2016 the first book in the Brilliant Minnesota Series was released titled, The Penderghast Puzzle Protectors. She also is part of a group mystery by Cozy Cat Press Authors titled Chasing the Codex. Julie’s serious side is revealed in a story included in the anthology, We Go On – Anthology for Veterans where the proceeds will go to veteran’s charities and is  available on Amazon. Her blog Sprinkled Notes is a little scattered like Granny but lends itself to wisdom and occasional flip flops about life. You will also find her on Facebook and Twitter. She encourages you to enjoy the moments; they may carry you through a lifetime.

 

PanGea Sound – the team behind the #audiobook for my #medical #thriller THE HEALER

images (24)It’s time I introduced the team behind the audiobook for The Healer. The novel was read by Georgina Tate of Pangea Soundlab in London and I’m really loving it, if I may say so myself…I cannot emphasize enough what an exciting and remarkable experience it was to have someone read my lines so well and make them more interesting than they sounded in my own head.
I can only recommend them for the quality and 13220695_474308702763374_7694318875342135183_othe speed of their work. They were easy to communicate with and highly professional. I know a lot of you out there are thinking of having your books produced. Get onto ACX and put your work out there.

 

PanGea Sound (aka Panos Chountoulidis and Georgina Tate) formed through combined loves of storytelling and sound.

During her Master’s degree in Sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, Georgina abandoned plaster and clay and took to the microphone recording stories, songs and sound art, and has been writing and experimenting with sound and narration ever since.photo

 

 

 

 

At the same time over in Athens Panos was making music and studying Audio Production. He came to London in 2014 to complete his degree at SAE Institute London.

With Panos’ technical expertise and musical ear, and Georgina’s love of the written and spoken word they began working together in 2015 producing music, sound design and audiobooks.13220695_474308702763374_7694318875342135183_o

Most days they can be found at home in Dalston, working in a dimension of sound and stories.

You can follow them here:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/pangeasoundlab

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pangeasoundlab

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/pangea-sound

The book is now available on Audible http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Crime-Thrillers/The-Healer-Audiobook/B01G62B9J6

and Amazon http://bookShow.me/B00QIJ4DJ6

Audio sample THE HEALER https://soundcloud.com/pangea-sound/the-healer-taster

 

The StoryPrayer-can-Heal-2

When advertising executive Erica Whittaker is diagnosed with terminal cancer, western medicine fails her. The only hope left for her to survive is controversial healer Arpan.

She locates the man whose touch could heal her in a remote place in Wales, but finds he has retired from the limelight and refuses to treat her. Erica, consumed by stage four pancreatic cancer, is desperate and desperate people are no longer logical nor are they willing to take no for animages (24) answer. Arpan has retired for good reasons.

Casting more than the shadow of a doubt over his abilities. So begins a journey that will challenge them both as the past threatens to catch up with him as much as with her.

Can he really heal her? Can she trust him with her life? And will they both achieve what they set out to do before running out of time?

Here is a link to a sample from the book slider-healer-new2

http://venturegalleries.com/blog/tuesday-sampler-the-healer-by-christoph-fischer/

Audio sample THE HEALER https://soundcloud.com/pangea-sound/the-healer-taster

13220695_474308702763374_7694318875342135183_o

As one reviewer said: Christoph Fischer has penned an original and thought provoking tale, expertly building an eloquent portrayal of human neurosis triggered by primal traits and pinpointing the depths that we will sink to, to achieve our goals. The plot weaves this way and that around the central character on the run up to a perfect little twist.

The Healer51yc4wyNVZL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_


When advertising executive Erica Whittaker is diagnosed with terminal cancer, western medicine fails her. The only hope left for her to survive is controversial healer Arpan. She locates the man whose touch could heal her but finds he has retired from the limelight and refuses to treat her.  Erica, consumed by stage four pancreatic cancer, is desperate and desperate people are no longer logical nor are they willing to take no for an answer. Arpan has retired for good reasons, casting more than the shadow of a doubt over his abilities. So begins a journey that will challenge them both as the past threatens to catch up with him as much as with her.  Can he really heal her? Can she trust him with her life? And will they both achieve what they set out to do before running out of time?

Amazon: http://smarturl.it/thehealerthriller
http://bookShow.me/B00QIJ4DJ6

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23662030-the-healer

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheHealerNovelbyChristophFischer?ref=hl

Book-likes: http://booklikes.com/the-healer-christoph-fischer/book,12975746

Rifflebooks: https://read.rifflebooks.com/books/388235

Do characters all have to be super heroes, brave, unfallible and larger than life? Honouring realism and the right to be human

“A recent comment about one of my fictional characters brought up the following thoughts in me.

I know that bravery, attractive cheerleaders and bulging biceps alpha males are the stuff that great dreams and heroic tales are made of.
Of course it is inspiring to read about the people who are fearless and unbreakable.
Authors want to write role models and set good examples.

So characters can become brave, unfallible and larger than life, so that the readers find them likeable and make your book a bestseller.

What about the more normal humans? Those only partially heroic or good? The flawed, the ‘spinesless’ ‘weak’ or even the ‘cowards’ ? Should we write about them in anything but a derogative way? Who are they anyway? Surely not us?

Hand on heart: Who of us is sure they would hold up under torture? Who would be sure not to save their own skin if pushed against the wall and forced to make an unthinkable choice?

 

 

We’re creating false illusions about heroism and unrealistic expectations about people.

What about representation and realism?

Don’t get me wrong. I love the fearless hero, too, I admire his actions and wish I could be like him. But I’m probably not going to live up to his standards, however hard I would like to do so.

Sometimes, however, I’m tired of watching or reading about the big-chested models and biceps-bulging machos with their super-powers who never fail and who can make the reader feel small and inadequate for being a regular human.

images (28)

Isn’t it the era of the geek and the anti-hero, a time where we come to realise that everyone has their place in our world – brave or weak, attractive or regular? That everyone is unique, with good and bad sides, individual strengths and doesn’t have to be perfect?

I’m writing a lot of WW2 fiction and I doubt that all the soldiers in that era were of the alpha-male type, as much of the fiction written about that time leads us to believe. In my novels I focus on characters who are not perfect, who are afraid, who act ‘human’ because I believe that is reality and that doesn’t need to be judged so harshly.

Only because a drag queen may cower in the corner when faced with brutal violence it doesn’t make her a lesser person. She has her place in society and might be the support that stops someone from committing suicide, the person nursing you to health, bailing you out or winning the Grammy or Eurovision Song Contest.

(Thanks for that speech Conchita!)

Halina and LudwikaNow to the case of my character Ludwika: A woman who moves to Germany and leaves her child behind with her sister and mother – in exchange for the promise of safety for her family – is she out of her mind or the opposite? Ludwika is actually based on a real person and who are we to judge her decisions at the time? Doing the heroic or ‘done’ thing often doesn’t help anyone under Nazi rule; and not everyone is a warrior type with unbeatable strength.

CWBY8Hx

I remember the key scene in “The Reader”. A woman has the choice to follow orders and keep a door locked, by doing so allowing multiple deaths to occur. But if she opens the door to free the captives, she will be killed herself by those who gave her the orders. I’d like to think I’d have opened the door, but can I be sure? What would you have done?

So i6c69c-christoph2bfischer2bprofile2bpic2bludwikaf you read any of my novels, you’ll meet some bravery but no glorification and super humans. You’ll get real characters who may be good but not perfect. These are characters that I can relate to more than the hero stereotype. They won’t make you feel inadequate when reading about them but it doesn’t have to mean they are lesser human beings, less likeable or don’t have good sides to them. They all have a story to tell.

 

It is my believe that it is ok to be flawed and human and ok to write characters that way.

What do you think?

 

Reviewed for the Historical Novel Society: In the Shadow of the Storm BY ANNA BELFRAGE

In the Shadow of the Storm

BY

Kit is abducted in a mysterious and intriguing opening scene that leaves much room for speculation. It soon turns out, though, that she is the bastard child of Thomas de Monmouth, and she is being forced to replace her legitimate but runaway half-sister Katherine de Monmouth in an arranged marriage to Adam de Guirande. This union is suggested by Baron Mortimer and encouraged by him with a great dowry. Kit, posing as Katherine, and Adam find themselves sexually compatible in a series of explicit romantic scenes but they still have to overcome their other differences. The real Katherine had an affair with Baron Mortimer and keeping the switch hidden becomes more difficult as the novel progresses, while the political background for this early 14th century story is the uprising of Roger Mortimer against the king.

Belfrage does a great job at depicting the political chess moves, manipulations, blackmail, loyalties, alliances, the clans and ‘houses’ of those days. We also get to see the world through a woman’s eyes, the morals of marriage and ‘gender politics’.

The romance part is very competently written with excellent chemistry and intriguing main characters. The love story is original and the emotional developments come off as very believable and enjoyable. As for the historical value: At times I missed a sense of location and scene setting and found that the battles and fighting happened too far in the background. I would have liked to be more engaged in that side of things, since I knew nothing of the uprising before; I found the setting, however, very fascinating and gripping.

Share this review
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PUBLISHED

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,

PERIOD

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ISBN
(UK) 9781781324332

FORMAT
Paperback

PAGES
396

First reviews for our anthology “Punk Rocker”

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Here are the first few amazing reviews for PUNK ROCKER, the anthology I have contributed to.

The book is available on Amazon

US https://amzn.com/B01FCBBC6W

UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01FCBBC6W

5.0 out of 5 starsWhat a treat!five-star25punk rocker
By Luv2read on May 14, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Punk Rocker by Christoph Fischer, Brenda Perlin, Mark Berry, et. al. is a delightful romp down memory lane, the good ole days of punk rock when Leonard Cohen wrote, “I remember you well from the Chelsea Hotel,” referring to his tryst with Janis Joplin. That’s what I’m reminded of as I dance through the pages of short stories that are fun, hilarious, poignant, and endearing. Anyone who survived the days of loud music, lovemaking, and wild dancing with the gang of friends will love this book. I especially enjoyed the piece by Christoph Fischer where the awkwardness of being a teen in a pudgy body burns from the page. The writing is so good that I have to find more from this author who writes that he envied his school mates, he who was trapped in a life “which wasn’t me,” whose attempts to shape his hair with sugary water failed miserably, and had cheesy music tastes that this reader can relate to. Fischer’s writing as well as the other very talented authors is just too terrific not share with the world of readers out there yearning for a fun read. Wow, what a lucky happenstance find. Glad I ran across this one.

5.0 out of 5 starsPunk Rock Storiesfive-star25
By Jada Ryker on May 15, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Punk Rocker is a volume of wonderful punk rock stories.

I loved Brenda Perlin’s No Future. She adroitly captures a teen’s view of the world, giving us a glimpse of her zest for life and living for the day. Her dedication to David Bowie at the beginning is poignant.

I also enjoyed the story by Christoph Fischer. I’m a fan of his historical fiction, and it was a pleasant surprise to read his perspective on punk rock.

The images add a depth and breadth to the story. They help us visualize a time gone, but not forgotten.

Don’t forget to check out the companion, L. A. Punk Rocker. It’s a beautifully written depiction of punk rock.

5.0 out of 5 starsA good showfive-star25
By J. Melartin on May 11, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a delight to read, short stories / histories / memories of the various punk eras – UK, NYC and West Coast from the 70s through the 90s. Apart from the clothes and hair, punk erased the distance between fan and band. These pieces show all of that, sweetly, sometimes hilariously (getting teenage wasted and missing the show), sometimes seeing the snake eyes of addiction. I can’t really pick my favorites as all the pieces are strong and have something to contribute. That said, Mark Barry’s autobiography of a leather jacket is a fun way to traverse punk history.

5.0 out of 5 starsPacked with Punk Rock memories
By Georgia Rose on May 17, 2016
Format: Kindle Editionfive-star25
Punk Rocker is a terrific anthology made up of a mixture of memories and memoir, dedications and fictional short stories. So much has gone into the writing of this book that I can’t possibly do it justice in this short space but, doing what I can, here is my review.

While this book was coming together there were some huge losses to the music industry and it is therefore fitting that it opens with a dedication to David Bowie by Brenda Perlin and Scott Weiland by Jim Kavanagh. Both these writers convey that sense of loss that envelopes people when someone they idolised, though may never have met, dies.

There’s a poem from Carla Mullins called License to Thrill in which she expresses her love affair with punk rock. This is followed by the first short story from Mark Barry called Highway One. It tells the tale of Billy Idol, his beloved Harley and a trip up Highway One. Some precious time out before he sets off on a massive nationwide tour. Then, he meets a girl. Told in Barry’s inimitable style this is filled with delicious descriptions, wry observations and is a delight to read…and reread, because you’ll want to.

I haven’t come across Jim Kavanagh before but I thoroughly enjoyed his real life tales of Punk in New York City, an autobiographical account of his life at the time as he ran the streets, December 1980 which covers the shocking death of John Lennon, and finally, Sid.

Rebel Yell by Christoph Fischer was a favourite, among the many, and through his words I could feel his yearning for another life, a cooler life, a real life with his depiction of his teenage years in a Bavarian, small rural town. In a second piece, A Night to Remember, Fischer has grown up. He’s at college, loving life and protesting at every opportunity. This lifts the lid on one particular night.

Jorge P. Newbery has included anecdotes by way of a couple of excerpts from his own book, Burn Zones. This is an autobiographical account of how he was pushed to his physical and mental limits during his time of strife, and how he overcame the challenges he faced.

Caddy Rowland recalls her memories of Jay’s Longhorn Bar in Punk Paradise, Minnesota Style. I thoroughly related to her relief at being offered salvation from the disco scene and enjoyed her reminiscences.

In Memory of a Pistol Packing Reganite, is the fabulous addition to this anthology by Alison Braun and regales its readers with her experiences of the punk scene with the coolest dad ever. I was so envious reading this.

Steven E Metz was impossibly young when he got involved in L.A. Punk and in Listen to a Fifth Grader he tells the story of a night when it all went wrong. Having been brought up in the English countryside where our socialising was done rather differently and therefore never having been in a nightclub I loved reading Godzilla’s by Brenda Perlin. Godzilla’s was a punk club that opened in 1981 and it was where Perlin worked, not so much for the want of a job but so that she could get to see the bands for free. Perlin got to see some great bands and experienced the sort of exciting life every teen is seeking.

It’s so interesting to read about the experiences others had at ages you can relate to and this is as true of Godzilla’s as it is of the next, What Punk Rock Gave Me by Janet Salopek Green. Janet was a Catholic School Girl and tells of her experiences with the music and fashion of the time. I rather liked the ‘someone’s mother once pointed out that while we all thought we were so original, we had simply changed uniforms.’ Janet’s story also touches on the deaths involved and the impact that caused for her.

The Riot House by Erin McGowan was a great read. I loved the tale of this straight little girl who only wanted an early night because she had an algebra test the next day. But then she saw her sister escaping from the house and her plans changed. This story shows how by one decision one night can change everything.

The tale of An Ice Cream Calling: at The Clash Show Asbury Park Convention Hall 1982 by Alan Wynzel had me grinning. The painful memories just kept coming in this one, from the trying to be Punk thing to the joy of getting the tickets then on to the big event. Too much booze, real Punks, the unfortunate incident with the girls and of course, the ice cream…oh dear.

Brenda Perlin brings a reality check as she discusses the darker side of life in No Future both for the idols of the time, their fans and all who chose that lifestyle. This leads into the second fictional short story from Mark Barry. Titled, The Jacket, this is the autobiographical account of a jacket, a Brando, of course, and the history of its ownership which sets it apart from other jackets. It’s been there, done it and seen life as few others have and Barry is just the writer to bring you this glorious tale. I won’t tell you who owned The Jacket, that is for you to discover and as always I shall be envious of whoever is about to embark on reading Barry’s work. Enjoy.

Lastly, and most poignantly we come full circle from the first dedication as Brenda Perlin brings us The Mirror… I shall say no more on this as you need to come across it, and all the other golden nuggets that fill this book, yourself.

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As some of you already know, I’ve contributed to an anthology called PUNK ROCKER, the much anticipated sequel to “L.A. Punk Rocker”: top author Brenda Perlin’s best-selling punk anthology.

The book is available on Amazon

US https://amzn.com/B01FCBBC6W

UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01FCBBC6W

 

My medical thriller THE HEALER is now available as audiobook

51yc4wyNVZL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_THE HEALER is now available as audiobook on audible.com itunes and Amazon !

PanGea Sounds did an excellent job – if I may so as listener to the finished product. I was so inspired by the production that I shuffled my workload and spent the last week going over the draft for the sequel.

(If you would like to be a beta-reader for that, please let me know😉

You can listen to a sample here 

and

You can read an excerpt here

The StoryPrayer-can-Heal-2

When advertising executive Erica Whittaker is diagnosed with terminal cancer, western medicine fails her. The only hope left for her to survive is controversial healer Arpan.

She locates the man whose touch could heal her in a remote place in Wales, but finds he has retired from the limelight and refuses to treat her. Erica, consumed by stage four pancreatic cancer, is desperate and desperate people are no longer logical nor are they willing to take no for animages (24) answer. Arpan has retired for good reasons.

Casting more than the shadow of a doubt over his abilities. So begins a journey that will challenge them both as the past threatens to catch up with him as much as with her.

Can he really heal her? Can she trust him with her life? And will they both achieve what they set out to do before running out of time?

Here is a link to a sample from the book slider-healer-new2

http://venturegalleries.com/blog/tuesday-sampler-the-healer-by-christoph-fischer/

This is PanGea on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pangeasoundlab/?fref=ts

13220695_474308702763374_7694318875342135183_o

As one reviewer said: Christoph Fischer has penned an original and thought provoking tale, expertly building an eloquent portrayal of human neurosis triggered by primal traits and pinpointing the depths that we will sink to, to achieve our goals. The plot weaves this way and that around the central character on the run up to a perfect little twist.

The Healer51yc4wyNVZL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_


When advertising executive Erica Whittaker is diagnosed with terminal cancer, western medicine fails her. The only hope left for her to survive is controversial healer Arpan. She locates the man whose touch could heal her but finds he has retired from the limelight and refuses to treat her.  Erica, consumed by stage four pancreatic cancer, is desperate and desperate people are no longer logical nor are they willing to take no for an answer. Arpan has retired for good reasons, casting more than the shadow of a doubt over his abilities. So begins a journey that will challenge them both as the past threatens to catch up with him as much as with her.  Can he really heal her? Can she trust him with her life? And will they both achieve what they set out to do before running out of time?

Amazon: http://smarturl.it/thehealerthriller
http://bookShow.me/B00QIJ4DJ6

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23662030-the-healer

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheHealerNovelbyChristophFischer?ref=hl

Book-likes: http://booklikes.com/the-healer-christoph-fischer/book,12975746

Rifflebooks: https://read.rifflebooks.com/books/388235

Ludwika reaches over 200 Reviews

Thanks to all the kind-hearted readers who took the time to leave a review for Ludwika. This is a big milestone and achieved in such a short time. Ludwika is currently in production for an audio-book, hopefully hitting audible.com, itunes and Amazon in July.
Reviews are so important on Amazon to be visible; they are also great feedback for the author and guidance for other readers. I appreciate all of them!

5.0 out of 5 stars Must read, April 25, 2016
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
I just finished this book . It is one of the best books I have read in a long time. I cannot wait to read more books written by Christoph my new favorite author.Keep on writing you are brilliant. Thank you
 Halina's children at Kensington Book Fair
on May 5, 2016
Based on the olife of a Polish woman who was caught up in the horros of WWII. You will find this a most captivating story. It is so good, I was sorey it ended.
on May 1, 2016
Book held my interest. Cried during some of it
5.0 out of 5 starsA Captivating Book., May 23, 2016
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Ludwika, is a fictionalized biography of a WWII Polish woman who seeks to save her family and herself throughout the ravages of Nazi domination. Christoph Fischer is a specialist in the horrors of the period and place and has applied his understanding of the victimization made of the war that never had a chance to end all wars. Ludwika makes decisions and takes on jobs, responsibilities always in the hope of a positive outcome. That she seldom succeeds is in the nature of the political setting and factions. That she persists in her efforts is a tribute to her upbringing and efforts to maintain hope. Fischer exhibits a fine understanding of the motivation that pushes the young woman to press ever forward.
At the end of the book, the author lets us in on the secret: Ludwika was real and her descendants wish to hear from anyone who knew her in the harshness of her life. This is a captivating read made more touching by the final notes.
on May 22, 2016
Poignant reminder of war and the struggles of life in that environment
on May 6, 2016
I have read many books written from the Jewish perspective and others from the German viewpoint. This is only the second from a Polish citizen who had been relocated to Germany during the war. While the storyline was interesting, it wasn’t terrifying as many WWII stories are. Readers who want the emotions without the terror will enjoy this. Ludwika agreed to relocate to Germany at the request of a highly placed young SS officer who intended marriage when it could be proven that she was of German ancestry in past generations. Until that time, she was his housekeeper, caring for his flat while he spent months away, assigned to newly claimed territories by Germany. She had to make the difficult decision to leave her young daughter behind with family, and In return, Ludwika was promised safety and stability for the family, which was allowed to stay io their Polish farm, while the other families in tneir town were ruthlessly gunned down or deported, or transported to camps. It might have worked as planned if her SS officer hadn’t been killed. Ludwika found herself alone several times, but always managed to land on her feet. This is not to say she had an easy life in a work camp. At that time, Ludvika fell in love with another foreigner from a different camp, who then suddenly disappeared. After the work camps were liberated, Ludvicka found herself pregnant and living in a holding camp for displaced people. This is where the story interested me because it is almost incredible to those of us reading about the period after the war to understand that liberated people actually might have lived for many years in these holding facilities while their families could be found or even if they still had homes or families to return to in their respective countries. The ending was a bit of a suprise, but the biggest suprise came after the end of the book when the reader is told that Ludwika was a real person who actually lived a big part of this story. A few characters had to be invented so the author could make sense of a story which contained some gaping holes. The book was very interesting and I enjoyed it. I don’t seek out editing errors, but I found a lot of then in Ludvika’s story. While I really enjoyed the storytelling, I only gave Ludwika four stars because it just didn’t bowl me over, as do the best books I’ve ever read. But four stars is good! I highly recommend Ludwika to others, especially if they want to learn about life during WWII without the terror.
Reviews are so important on Amazon to be visible; they are also great feedback for the author and guidance for other readers. I appreciate all of them!
Thank you
can 005
 You gotta love this one, too:
1.0 out of 5 stars Katty choice, May 25, 2016
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Previewed only..did not buy
It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.
Editorial Review:”This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”

Ludwika kindle link http://bookShow.me/B018UTHX7A
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